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Emergency Preparedness

It is important to be prepared for emergencies.  We value having your family ready for impending emergencies.  This page lists ways to be prepared for tornadoes and how to put together an emergency kit.  There are a number of resources on the Internet about emergency preparedness.  The links on this page point to Ready.gov, the federal government's page for emergency preparedness.

Before a Tornado

  • To begin preparing, you should build an emergency kit and make a family communications plan.
  • Listen to NOAA Weather Radio or to commercial radio or television newscasts for the latest information. In any emergency, always listen to the instructions given by local emergency management officials.
  • Be alert to changing weather conditions. Look for approaching storms.
  • Look for the following danger signs:
    • Dark, often greenish sky
    • Large hail
    • A large, dark, low-lying cloud (particularly if rotating)
    • Loud roar, similar to a freight train.
    • If you see approaching storms or any of the danger signs, be prepared to take shelter immediately.

 

Emergency Kit

Food

Consider the following things when putting together your emergency food supplies:

    • Store at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food.
    • Choose foods your family will eat.
    • Remember any special dietary needs.
    • Avoid foods that will make you thirsty.
    • Choose salt-free crackers, whole grain cereals and canned foods with high liquid content.

    Following a disaster, there may be power outages that could last for several days. Stock canned foods, dry mixes and other staples that do not require refrigeration, cooking, water or special preparation. Be sure to include a manual can opener and eating utensils.

    Water

    You should store at least one gallon of water per person per day. A normally active person needs at least one gallon of water daily just for drinking however individual needs vary, depending on age, physical condition, activity, diet and climate.

    To determine your water needs, take the following into account:

    • One gallon of water per person per day, for drinking and sanitation.
    • Children, nursing mothers and sick people may need more water.
    • A medical emergency might require additional water.
    • If you live in a warm weather climate more water may be necessary. In very hot temperatures, water needs can double.
    • Keep at least a three-day supply of water per person.

    Basic Disaster Supplies

    A basic emergency supply kit could include the following recommended items:

    • Water, one gallon of water per person per day for at least three days, for drinking and sanitation
    • Food, at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food
    • Battery-powered or hand crank radio and a NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert and extra batteries for both
    • Flashlight and extra batteries
    • First aid kit
    • Whistle to signal for help
    • Dust mask to help filter contaminated air and plastic sheeting and duct tape to shelter-in-place
    • Moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for personal sanitation
    • Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities
    • Manual can opener for food
    • Local maps
    • Cell phone with chargers, inverter or solar charger